Our Civilisation


Volume 1

This book looks at the history of science and civilisation. It is in five volumes. Volume 5 is in two parts. The first volume deals with the role of Greece in the rise of science and civilisation and how such a role has been exaggerated. The second looks at the role of Islam. The third deals with misconceptions in this subject. The fourth explains the lines and times of passage of sciences and civilisation to the West. The fifth looks at the substance of such influences. The work relies on old and new sources, Muslim and non Muslim. It includes some pictures and maps, and most of all a lengthy bibliography in volume five.

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Volume 2

It is only by exploring closely the history of science and civilisation, relying on facts, and ignoring claims and assumptions, that you can conclude that it was Islam, the faith, which was at the foundation of Islamic civilisation.
Any aspect of such civilisation came as a result of the implementation of the faith, in fact dictated by it.
Islam never had an Inquisition that hounded scholars, women/witches, ‘heretics,’ Jews…; in fact, Islamic civilisation rose together with Islamic power and fell with it.
It was also Islamic civilisation which connected both East and West and brought together the two halves of the world to give us our modern civilisation which, in its better aspects, is a symbiosis of what humans, when at their best (which is rather rare), can accomplish.

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Volume 3

A police inspector enquired about a gold mine that had been recently looted, focusing on four persons who had suddenly become millionaires. They all, however, gave justifications for their sudden wealth.
The first explained that his wealth came from a sudden inheritance from his Aunty Rosa, and then cited witnesses, friends and other members of the family who confirmed the inheritance story.
The second who did not know the first claimed that his wealth came as a result of a big win at the casino, and he showed pictures of such a big win: he celebrating with other casino members, all crooks in their appearance, yet the pictures acted as evidence in support of his story.
The third used the same technique, also citing witnesses, including someone called Jojo, a thin moustached odd looking creep, who even confirmed that it was he who bought the winning lottery ticket.
The fourth also relied on dubious looking witnesses who all swore that the fortune came after a treasure was found buried in a garden.
The policeman had doubts but everyone’s story seemed fine at first impression.
If, however, the police inspector investigated further, he would find that all four persons, although not knowing each other, and living north-south, east and west of the gold mine, still all of them pass it on their way home and also pass it on the way to town. The fact that all four became rich precisely after the gold mine was looted was also a strange coincidence. If the policeman knew that they all four either knew someone who worked at the mine, or that they had access to the keys of the main gate, then there was a high certainty that the four of them owed their wealth to the looted gold mine.
Our policeman does not need to look for gold traces on their clothes or hands (that we leave to volume 5). If, however, he can show the connections of the four to the gold mine such as by looking at dates of trips and stops, and who travelled where, and who stopped where, and one or two other facts, he can prove the guilt of the four lascars and the lies of their witnesses.
If the pictures of the casino can also be proved to be forgeries, and that the ticket of the lottery never existed, and that Aunty Rosa was in reality very poor and that she died in a hospice for the destitute, and that the garden was in fact concreted twenty years ago (by a modern Muslim) then any of the four stories can be proved to be a con. This is indeed what we show in this volume.
Also Chapters 1 and 2 and 3 of this volume include the explanations by the four persons, explanations which make no sense at all, are contradictory, and like all lies get lost in unintelligible rants.
In volume 4, we will show what happened in reality; how the gold mine was emptied, when, how, and by whom.

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Volume 4

Imagine you have two sets of explanations.
Set A explains to you how you get to Paris from some places. Say, from London to Paris, and this first direction instructs you to drive north, past Birmingham, then past Manchester, into Scotland, and continue further north by Ferry. From Marseilles to Paris, you take the ferry, cross the Mediterranean, and continue south. From Rome, you drive as far as Venice, then take the ferry into Asia Minor…. From Moscow: take the metro, then a plane bound for Siberia… All these are the types of explanations for the rise of modern sciences and civilisation today’s scholarship abounds with.
If, however, you read into this volume, it is as simple as this: you are on the edge of a circle, and you want to get to the centre of that circle; just cut any straight line, wherever you are, and half way into that straight line you find yourself at the centre of the circle. That’s precisely how the rise of science and civilisation worked as we see in this volume. Any way we take, any line we follow, any agency or agent of impact, any manifestation of science, business, arts, architecture, and even military impact, all routes, all agents, all manifestations, everything leads you to the same Islamic source, such a repetitious pattern at times you get bored. But like truth, and like anything that makes sense, it hates deviations, the obscure, and the complex.

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Volume 5a

This volume focuses on the Islamic impact in various areas of civilisation and on the sciences. It progresses in alphabetical order. It hence begins with agriculture and finishes with trade. It is divided in two parts. There is a comprehensive bibliography at the end. This author is no expert at every subject. In areas where he feels he cannot do the job properly, and knows of authors much better qualified than himself, the likes of David King, Julio Samso, Jonathan Bloom, L. Bergrenn, F. Sezgin, R. Rashed and others (he clearly cites), he lets them do the explaining. He also gives plenty of references of the excellent works and their authors, males and females, Muslims and non Muslims, old and new. This author only steps in where he feels it is necessary for him to do so, and more or less fills the blanks. Bland, useless works, and their authors, unfortunately quite a lot of them, he does not burden either himself or the readers with them.

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Volume 5b

Most books in this field by others, just as other works on Islam, are great bores. What ‘scholars’ of Islam do, other than the defects we spent it seems years dealing with in the previous volumes, is that they keep repeating their lamentable stuff and inane claims. We said plenty on that, we won’t rant about it here. The other deficiency that mares their works is that they repeat each other. So, this author, who is different from the lot, likes to focus on what the others ignore, although what they ignore is more important than what they focus on. One particular area they nearly all ignore is the subject of Muslim industry and its impact on the Christian West. So, this author devotes to this subject three whole chapters. And with these three chapters we begin this second part of volume 5.

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